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Cannes worker breaks silence on red carpet run-in with Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson



Tom Hanks was absent from this morning’s Asteroid City photo-call at Cannes after clearing a red carpet run-in with a staffer at the movie premiere last night.

Hanks, one of the world’s biggest stars, and his wife Rita Wilson were photographed with Vincent Chaplin at the Wes Anderson film premiere last night.

Rita was quick to clear up the confusion last night, insisting that she and Tom couldn’t just hear what the man was saying.

Shortly thereafter, Chaplain β€” who has worked at the festival for ten years β€” came forward to back up her story.

‘Nothing happened, the picture is completely confusing,’ Chaplain told DailyMail.com on Wednesday morning, adding that the couple had asked him if they should go back to the red carpet start with the other stars.

Hanks was absent from the well-attended photo-call where co-stars Jason Schwartzman, Scarlett Johansson, Bryan Cranston and others applauded today.

where is tom Hanks was notably absent from the Asteroid City photo-call and press conference

Hanks did not attend the press conference after the photo-call, where his co-stars answered questions about the film

It’s a misunderstanding! Cannes worker Vincent Chaplain, who was photographed in the tense moment with Rita Wilson and Tom Hanks, said the couple were just asking if they should get back to the beginning of the carpet.

A source close to the actor, however, told DailyMail.com that he would never attend, and would return to the US for a different event today.

The movie, in which Hanks plays a supporting actor as Schwartzman’s character’s father-in-law, is in the running for the Palme d’Or.

It has already received rave reviews.

Chaplain worked as a ‘red carpet manager’ at Cannes for ten years

‘Is this Anderson giving the finger to those who scoff at the stylized dysfunction of his characters?

“You can’t wake up if you’re not asleep,” goes a mantra repeated by the cast in another scene.

‘Is the director talking about the importance of forgetting your madness and surrendering to whimsy? If so, where do I sign?’

The film received rave reviews.

Peter Bradshaw of The Guardian wrote in his four-star write-up: ‘Asteroid City’s eccentricity, its charm, its exuberance and the fine detail within the tableau frames make it such a joy. So, too, does the dapper styling of classic American pop culture.

Chaplaine featured in the 2018 premiere of Burning in Cannes

Chaplin explained that Hanks and Wilson were asking if they should go back to where the rest of the film crew was.

Hanks and Wilson were struggling to hear him, he said, over the shouting of photographers

‘With each new shot, your eyes wander around the screen, catching all the little quirks and embellishments of the imagery, each one getting a micro-smile.

‘The film moves deftly and exuberantly, absorbing the impact of pathos and loneliness without letting itself slow down. It’s tempting to think of this discreet emptiness as some kind of symptom, but I really don’t think so: it’s an expression of style. And what style it is.’

Ed Bottom of The Time gave a four-star review that read: ‘Some of the lines seem like pops to Anderson’s detractors. Johansson’s femme-fatal actress, recovering from an abusive marriage, says she and Augie are “two catastrophically wounded people who don’t reveal the depth of their emotions . . . because they don’t want to.”

‘Is this Anderson giving the finger to those who scoff at the stylized dysfunction of his characters? “You can’t wake up if you’re not asleep,” goes a mantra repeated by the cast in another scene.

‘Is the director talking about the importance of forgetting your madness and surrendering to whimsy? If so, where do I sign?’

Last year, Hanks was seen yelling at photographers to ‘back the f*** off’! After a tense interaction in midtown

Impressive: The film was showered with rave reviews after its premiere at the 76th Cannes Film Festival on Tuesday

Review: Early reviews of Wes Anderson’s Asteroid City hailed 1950s sci-fi as a ‘delightful triumph of pure style’.

In his impressive five-star review, Geoffrey McNabb of The Independent said: ‘In its own offbeat way, Asteroid City is an Anderson patchwork of Cold War paranoia and American family values ​​in their often hypocritical glory.

‘It’s every bit as arch as his best work, while still managing to tug hard on the heartstrings.’

Todd McCarthy of Deadline branded the film “a fresh, original and disarming creation unlike anything else you’ve seen”.

He said: ‘Scene after scene has a snap and rush that matches the pace of dialogue delivery and gives the film a kind of stylized urgency that is both distinctive and funny.

‘Sometimes it’s hard to keep going, and yet it doesn’t matter anyway, because one feels welcome in a strange world.

‘On the other hand, the show-off in the film doesn’t really pay off; Arguably, there’s little to show for it overcomplicating the work, and the general audience, unlike art film buffs, will be confused as to what’s going on.

‘There is another level of activity which is, arguably, more of a nuisance than a plus.

‘But otherwise, it’s a fresh, original and disarming creation unlike anything else you might have seen with some stylized storytelling that’s remarkable and often exciting.’

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